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Its strange that the SLA and Sewer Board are always accusing SLCPO of sending out half-truths or incorrect information. Well, guess what, those pro-sewer folks that are using scare tactics by telling anyone that will listen that if their home/cabin is destroyed by fire, they will not be able to rebuild unless they are connected to a sewer system. To verify the accuracy of this, Mr. Matt Schanz, Director of Tri-County Health was contacted and as was expected, a complete lie. Please see Mr. Schanz's comments below: This seems to be a common question recently and I will do my best to address it. In response to your inquiry, I refer directly to Northeast Tri County Health District Regulation 01-2007, On-Site Sewage Systems. If a cabin burns down and a replacement cabin is proposed that generates the same amount of wastewater (two bedroom home replaces a two bedroom home), NETCHD would allow the continued use of the existing system unless we determined that a failure existed of that system. A failure of a system (defined by the above referenced code) means a condition of an on-site sewage system or component that threatens the public health by inadequately treating sewage or by creating a potential for direct or indirect contact between sewage and the public. The code defines examples of failure as: · Sewage on the ground · Sewage backing up into a structure caused by slow soil absorption of septic tank effluent · Sewage leaking from a sewage tank, pump chamber, holding tank, collection system, or another integrated component · Cesspools or seepage pits where evidence of groundwater or surface water quality degradation exists · Inadequately treated effluent contaminating ground water or surface water · Noncompliance with standards stipulated on a permit. If, in the review process, it became evident that a failure exists, then NETCHD would require a repair system to be constructed, or if a community sewer system was available, require connection to that system. It should also be noted that if an expansion of the home takes place (the two bedroom home is replaced with a 3 bedroom home) then we consider this an expansion and a system meeting all current construction requirements would need to be permitted. In some cases on small lots adjacent to surface water, not all the setbacks can be met and an expansion would not be possible. I hope this information is useful and please let me know if you have other questions or if I may be of further assistance. Matt Schanz, R.S. Environmental Health Director Northeast Tri County Health District 260 South Oak Street Colville WA 99114 Ph. 509-684-2262 Fax 509-684-8506 mschanz@netchd.org www.netchd.org 

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 From: Matt Schanz [mailto:mschanz@netchd.org

Sent: Wednesday, July 06, 2011 4:24 PM
To: S.L.C.P.O.
Cc: Jim Sayre
Subject: RE: Rebuilding After A Fire at Sacheen Lake AND discharging raw sewage into the lake

In response to your inquiry, I refer directly to Northeast Tri County Health District Regulation 01-2007, On-Site Sewage Systems.  If a cabin burns down and a replacement cabin is proposed that generates the same amount of wastewater (two bedroom home replaces a two bedroom home), NETCHD would allow the continued use of the existing system unless we determined that a failure existed of that system.  A failure of a system (defined by the above referenced code) means a condition of an on-site sewage system or component that threatens the public health by inadequately treating sewage or by creating a potential for direct or indirect contact between sewage and the public.  The code defines examples of failure as:

 

 

·         Sewage on the ground

 

 

·         Sewage backing up into a structure caused by slow soil absorption of septic tank effluent

 

 

·         Sewage leaking from a sewage tank, pump chamber, holding tank, collection system, or another integrated component

 

 

·         Cesspools or seepage pits where evidence of groundwater or surface water quality degradation exists

 

 

·         Inadequately treated effluent contaminating ground water or surface water

 

 

·         Noncompliance with standards stipulated on a permit.

 

 

If, in the review process, it became evident that a failure exited, then NETCHD would require a repair system to be constructed, or if a community sewer system was available, require connection to that system.  It should also be noted that if an expansion of the home takes place (the two bedroom home is replaced with a 3 bedroom home) then we consider this an expansion and a system meeting all current construction requirements would need to be permitted.  In some cases on small lots adjacent to surface water, not all the setbacks can be met and an expansion would not be possible.

 

 

If there are concerns about other violations, such as a direct discharge, then I do recommend and strongly encourage that our office be contact to follow up on any violation.

  

I hope this information is useful and please let me know if you have other questions or if I may be of further assistance.

 

 Matt Schanz, R.S.

 

Environmental Health Director

Northeast Tri County Health District

260 South Oak Street

Colville WA  99114

Ph. 509-684-2262

Fax 509-684-8506

mschanz@netchd.org

www.netchd.org